Drumroll Please: Announcing the winners of the Mother’s Day challenge!

Drumroll Please: Announcing the winners of the Mother’s Day challenge!

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Thank you to all who sent in photos of the generations of matriarchs in your family tree over the last few weeks as part of the #momsinmyfamily challenge! We have enjoyed seeing the photos and reading the stories of your remarkable mothers, grandmothers and great-grandmothers. It’s so heartwarming to see multiple generations of women together.

We’re excited to introduce our winners!

Susan Jernigan McCullough shared this stunning wedding day collage:

The collage features Susan’s daughter and all her maternal ancestors going back 3 generations: her mother (Susan), both grandmothers, and all 4 great-grandmothers. The earliest of these photos was taken in 1905. Absolutely incredible, and probably the result of a lot of excellent genealogy research! Congratulations, Susan, and well done!

Next, we received this gem from Jacob Rainer in the MyHeritage Users Group:

“This photo represents the female lineage of my first, unfortunately deceased, wife,” writes Jacob. “The photograph shows very strong women. 2 world wars, flight, 2 currency reforms they have successfully mastered. The oldest was born in 1872. The youngest in 1965.” The photo was colorized with MyHeritage In Color™. Thanks for sharing, Jacob, and congratulations!

Our next winner is Peggy Wilkins, who sent us this beautiful collage:

“I made this for Mother’s Day to honor all the very strong women in my family,” writes Peggy. “My great-great-grandmother Julia and her daughter Emelie emigrated to America in 1870 from Munich, Germany. Julia had 2 children, but Emelie had 15, and her daughter Henrietta had 13, including my mom Frances. There were 6 daughters and she was number 4, as she always reminded me! I am Peggy, her only daughter, and Rebecca is the eldest of my two daughters. Rebecca just married in November, so she’s not a mother yet. I’m so happy to have portraits of my ancestors to share, and your photo tools made them come alive again after 100 years.” What an incredible tribute to 6 generations of strong and beautiful women! Congratulations, Peggy!

The next winner is Bob Hilliar, who sent the following photos:

The color photo features Bill’s mother and two sisters, and the black and white photo features his maternal grandmother and her sisters. “No male offspring in either generation,” writes Bill. “What happened to cause my brother and me is a mystery!”

“Both generations were great storytellers, especially about the world wars,” Bill recalls. “My grandmother was in France during the first world war and had a medal for her sharpshooting at Bisley, but was actually employed as a cook. She sometimes sneaked scraps to starving POWs, strictly against the rules, of course.

“My mother and her sisters would talk of the second world war and the Bristol blitz. They would take cover from the bombs in their family pub cellar in the city centre (probably safer than some of the public shelters provided).”

Amazing stories. Congratulations, Bill!

Last but not least, Tambra Byrne sent us the following photo:

The photo features 5 generations of oldest daughters, starting with Tambra’s daughter and ending with Tambra’s great-grandmother. “We are ALL the oldest children in our families and we are ALL daughters,” Tambra writes.

She also adds: “My great-grandparents had 2 daughters and 1 son. The son was killed in WWII. He never married or had children. So, the Lee surname died when my great-grandfather passed. As a way of keeping the surname in the family, my mother’s middle name is Lee, my middle name is Lee, my daughter’s middle name is Lee and now, my granddaughter’s middle name is Lee. I hope my granddaughter keeps the tradition going.” What a beautiful way to honor your family history. Congratulations, Tambra!

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to all for sending in your photos and stories! We love seeing all the ways you celebrate the remarkable women in your life.

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