9    Feb 20126 comments

Family history: Before it’s too late!

Today I read a moving article in The Guardian - “Top five regrets of the dying." It made me wonder about my own life. The first thing that came to mind was my family history project.

The article is based on Australian nurse Bronnie Ware, who spent several years working in hospice care with patients in the last few months of their lives. She included the patients' comments in a blog, Inspiration and Chai and authored a book, The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.

Among the common regrets:

  1. I wish I had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected.
  2. I wish I had not worked so hard. Continue reading "Family history: Before it’s too late!" »
6    Feb 20121 comment

UK: The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee

Sixty years ago today, Queen Elizabeth II came to the throne, and her Diamond Jubilee takes place during 2012.

Although she came to the throne on this day in 1952, her coronation took place on June 2, 1953.

Queen Elizabeth II is the male-line great-granddaughter of Edward VII, who inherited the crown from his mother, Queen Victoria. His father, Victoria's consort, was Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

Queen Elizabeth is a patrilineal descendant of Albert's family, the German House of Wettin. This princely house claims other notables, such as King Albert II of Belgium and former King Simeon II of Bulgaria.

Elizabeth's male-line ancestry goes back to Conrad the Greatof Meissen; see Patrilineal descent of Elizabeth II.

Through Victoria - and several of her great-great-grandparents, Elizabeth is directly descended from many British royals:

Continue reading "UK: The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee" »

31    Dec 20110 comments

New Year: Traditions around the world

In most cultures, the New Year is traditionally the time for hope. We look forward to a New Year which will be prosperous, that we will enjoy health, peace and other positive attributes.

And, of course, there are countries where the New Year is not celebrated on January 1, but in spring or fall.

Regardless of where or when, let’s look at some customs surrounding the New Year.

Auld Lang Syne – written by Scottish poet Robert Burns - is the New Year’s Eve song In English-speaking countries. Read the history of the song here.

Continue reading "New Year: Traditions around the world" »

9    Nov 20111 comment

Video: Beginner’s guide to family history documents

There are plenty of videos lurking around the internet that claim to give you a crash course in using documents for genealogical purposes.

Today's video simply and succinctly shows how resources such as birth, marriage and death certificates and medical records can help trace your family history. It's a great stepping stone for new amateurs who would like to get "hands-on" at the nearest opportunity.

Enjoy!

31    Aug 20110 comments

News from MyHeritage UK – 30 August 2011


The National Archives release more Security Service files...

This week the National Archives bolstered its current MI5 records collection by 171 records, bringing the total number of files available to approximately 5000. Spanning both the Second World War and post-war eras, there’s plenty of material to get your teeth into. Many of the files are available online at nationalarchives.gov.uk however; here are some of the most interesting additions...

Antonia Hunt (ALIAS) Tonia Lyon-Smith:- At the age of 15 Antonia was trapped in France by the German invasion on 1940. Instead of being sent to a concentration camp though, she was enlisted as an office girl by a Gestapo office in Paris. Prior to this, she was arrested by the very same Gestapo officers for a letter she had written on behalf of the resistance. In an amazing twist, the time spent at the office was overshadowed by the infatuations of a German officer named Karl Gagel. He even attempted to make contact with Antonia following her return to Britain! Continue reading "News from MyHeritage UK – 30 August 2011" »

9    Aug 20111 comment

On the Road Again: MyHeritage goes to Washington DC

MyHeritage is on the road once again - this time to Washington DC for the 31st IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, August 14-19.

This time next week, Chief Genealogist Daniel Horowitz, Genealogy Advisor for the UK Laurence Harris and myself (Genealogy Advisor for the US Schelly Talalay Dardashti) will be attending, presenting programs and staffing the MyHeritage display booth.

From left: Laurence, Schelly and Daniel at the 2009 IAJGS Philadelphia Conference

We look forward to meeting with old friends, with happy MyHeritage users and making many new friends.

In addition to our new MyHeritage Challenge - read below for how you can participate - we are all speaking at the week-long event.

Continue reading "On the Road Again: MyHeritage goes to Washington DC" »

7    Aug 20111 comment

Links We Like: Humor, a survey and a TV show

It's time for another edition of Links We Like.

This week, we have humor and history, a Canadian genealogy survey (but open to all) and a new UK family history show which will bring together Brits and Anglo-Indian relatives.

Humor and history

For a light-hearted look at history as it may have been written, check out this new, slightly irreverant genealogy blog - Today in Heritage History.

Continue reading "Links We Like: Humor, a survey and a TV show" »

1    Feb 20111 comment

The Science of…Name Changing

If you’ve hit ‘brick walls’ in family history research you might have noticed it; if you’ve got relatives trying to make a fresh start you might have seen it too. This is, of course, name changing: the process of legally altering your first name, last name, or both, so that your official moniker is something other than what was on your birth certificate.

It’s hard to be precise on this, but it does seem that this practice is becoming increasingly common. Statistics on the topic are hard to find for many countries, but for the UK – where data is available – it looks as though many more people are changing their names than in the past.

For the past few years, name changes via deed poll have increased dramatically in the UK. In 2007, they sat at around 40,000; in 2008, that figure rose to 46,000; in 2009, to 50,000; and in 2010, supposedly, to 90,000.
Continue reading "The Science of…Name Changing" »

11    Nov 20100 comments

UK Census Competition: Sharing Our Family Stories

We’ve just come across an interesting competition for UK users, and thought we’d share it with you.

On 27th March next year the UK will be conducting its national census, and to celebrate this a competition has been set up for UK residents to share their family stories.

Called ‘Then and now: family stories’, the competition gives people the chance to represent the changing face of Britain over the past several decades by showcasing the part their own families played in it.
Continue reading "UK Census Competition: Sharing Our Family Stories" »

15    Oct 20100 comments

MyHeritage to Sponsor Family History Day at the Imperial War Museum, London

On Saturday 6 November, the Imperial War Museum is holding its annual Family History Day. The event’s going to be packed with experts and specialists to help you with all aspects of your genealogy.

MyHeritage is the official sponsor of the event, and we’ll be manning a stand with computers, offering advice and helping visitors to get started or get through any sticking points in their family history research.


Continue reading "MyHeritage to Sponsor Family History Day at the Imperial War Museum, London" »

About us  |  Privacy  |  Tell a friend  |  Support  |  Site map
Copyright © 2015 MyHeritage Ltd., All rights reserved