15    Jan 20132 comments

Research: Address books as a resource

Do you have an address book? Have you inherited an old address book from your parents or grandparents? This is almost as good as discovering an ancestor's journal.

Will Kenny, wrote a post for Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) - Address book is a family history, bound by tradition - in which he writes:

....And this annual ritual recently reminded us of a big difference between pulling out a physical, paper address book and pulling up a contact list.

These days, if you keep your contact list on your phone or your computer, you live very much in the present. When you update an entry in your electronic contact list, you just edit the information. You replace the old with the new.

And when people are no longer connected to you, whether you somehow lose touch or they pass away, you merely delete them from your list, and from your life. At the same time, you delete a piece of your own personal history.

Diane Richards wrote a great blog post in Upfront (the National Genealogical Society blog) on her own use of these hand-written resources for family history, who writes that she is on her third one (begun in December 1998). Earlier ones now live in her "memory boxes." She also shows examples from her latest address book. Continue reading "Research: Address books as a resource" »

14    Jan 20132 comments

Family History: Have a mentor?

Do you have a genealogy mentor? Someone you can turn to and have your questions answered? Someone who can guide you through the problems and pitfalls or help you break through brick walls?

The genealogy community worldwide has always been very helpful to newcomers.

Someone once asked me why genealogists were so friendly. My answer was that we never know if the next person to ask a question might hold the “missing link” to our own research!

We are also reminded of the concept of paying forward help we ourselves received in the past. As we are helped, so we attempt to help others.

Continue reading "Family History: Have a mentor?" »

9    Jan 201328 comments

MyHeritage mobile app version 2.0 released today!

We're delighted to announce the release of MyHeritage app version 2.0, our free mobile application, packed with exciting new features. Now you can build and edit your family tree, add more information to it, and take your heritage with you anywhere you go.

MyHeritage App 2.0 - Edit your tree on the go!

Our mobile app is available for iPad, iPhone and Android smartphones and tablets, in 32 languages, and has been optimized for each platform using cutting-edge HTML5 and SVG technologies. Download the new app now, for free, from Apple's App Store or Google Play.

Continue reading "MyHeritage mobile app version 2.0 released today!" »

18    Dec 20125 comments

Genea-journey: The right road

Are you on the right road?

Genealogy research defines taking the road to discovery. There are traffic lights, stop signs, many turnings, and cars stuck in traffic. In the country, narrow lanes are fringed with trees, obscuring views of towns, few cars and dead ends. Highways have slippery curves, rest stops and fast-moving vehicles, while exits lead to other byways or tollbooths! Sometimes we may have a map, while at other times, we are in uncharted territory.

MyHeritage's US genealogy advisor Schelly Talalay Dardashti wrote this piece back in 2003 for a newspaper column. It has been adapted from the original version, but the journey remains the same in 2012 and beyond.

LIGHTS

Continue reading "Genea-journey: The right road" »

9    Nov 20120 comments

Hidden Memorial: Honoring fallen heroes

Our genealogy team love challenges – so imagine the reaction of Laurence Harris, MyHeritage's Head of Genealogy (UK), when he was shown a 66-year-old Memorial Board  commemorating the names of Servicemen who had died in WWII.

The board had been hidden in a rarely-used storage area for more than 30 years.

The challenge was on!  Laurence volunteered to trace living family members of the men so that they could be invited to a special service to remember and honor them and to rededicate the Board.

Laurence took this as both a personal and professional challenge.  He recognized the importance of learning about these forgotten heroes of the past, enabling the present generation to honor them, and ensuring that their stories are preserved for future generations.

Along the way, he discovered many interesting stories. Over the next few weeks we'll be sharing with you some of these stories and explaining how Laurence managed to trace the  descendants.

Do you have stories to share about unsung war heroes in your family? Let us know in the comments below, and email relevant photos to stories@myheritage.com

23    Aug 20125 comments

MyHeritage: Cherokees and more!

It sounds like a genealogical cliché, but Kerry Elkins’ family story that they were part Cherokee Indian appears to be correct - through the England family line.

Kerry, 67, lives in Redmond, Oregon, with his wife Joyce and children Aaron and Amber, both college students. Born in Neodesha, Kansas, he received his biology BS and MS from Pittsburg State University (Kansas).

Kerry with his wife Joyce and children Aaron and Amber

Kerry with his wife Joyce and children Aaron and Amber

Now retired, his career has included a stint as a sonarman on the destroyer USS Brownson, as an FDA investigator, a radiation safety officer, a health officer and the owner of a computer store.

He caught the gen bug from his mother, who worked on her family’s history.

Continue reading "MyHeritage: Cherokees and more!" »

22    Aug 20125 comments

Family History: Has it inspired you to write?

Researching family history is about finding information on our ancestors, discovering relatives and hearing new stories, not heard before, about all these people.

Recording and collating this information for your family tree - and ensuring that your family and descendants will have access to it in the future - has far-reaching effects, not the least of which is improving your writing skills.

This article in the Sterling Observer describes how Marianne Wheelaghan (Edinburgh, Scotland) caught the "genea-bug" and how it led to writing her debut novel, The Blue Suitcase. It's about her mother's and aunt's experiences growing up in Germany during WWII.

Marianne said she had very limited knowledge of her mother Gertrude's background. She knew her mother was born and raised in Germany, and came to live in Scotland after the war.

One day, a suitcase filled with letters and diary pages was discovered by a family member. The documents were written by Marianne's aunt (Gertrude's sister) who immigrated to Argentina after the war. Translated, they provide insight into their lives during war-time Germany.

Marianne - thanks to these documents - become very interested in her family history, and began to write her book.

Has finding information about your family inspired you to begin a new hobby (family history), or even to start a new career?

Let us know in the comments section below.

7    Aug 20122 comments

Genealogy: Why women are hard to find

According to this article in News OK, it's more difficult to find female ancestors.

Some reasons are that women had no voting rights, no land ownership rights, and their names changed after marriage.

Thus, there were fewer documents containing relevant information, or it was hard to find the connections between existing documents and a later marriage, with a new surname.

This makes it hard to locate our female ancestors as well as their extended families.

Today, in most countries, women are equal citizens in every way, and enjoy full property ownership and voting rights. Many women either retain their maiden names or the new couple creates a double-barreled surname.  These social changes could arguably make researching our female ancestors a bit easier - at least in the future.

People like genealogy because of the challenge of finding new family members.

Have you had problems locating female ancestors? Are there those you have not yet identified? Were you able to find them? What resources did you use to overcome a specific challenge?

We'd like to learn about your experiences via the comments below.

7    Feb 201210 comments

Research: Using a professional genealogist

A few days ago we posted a poll on MyHeritage’s Twitter account, asking readers if they’d ever paid a genealogist to do family history research.

Of those who responded, 33% said that they, or someone they knew, had paid a genealogist; 67% said they hadn’t.

The idea that 1 in 3 people are paying genealogists to research is an interesting one that we’d like to explore further.

Have you ever paid a genealogist and, if yes, what was it you wanted them to help with that you couldn’t access yourself through MyHeritage or some other genealogy source?

Continue reading "Research: Using a professional genealogist" »

3    Feb 20126 comments

WDYTYA: An interview with Lisa Kudrow

Lisa Kudrow in the episode on her own family (Season 1, Episode 3)

Lisa Kudrow, executive producer of the US version of “Who Do You Think You Are?” was the guest for a group phone interview on Friday, January 27.

I was honored to participate in the call which focused on the show’s new season, which begins at 8pm, Friday, February 3, on NBC.

This year"s celebs are Martin Sheen, Marisa Tomei, Blair Underwood, Reba McEntire, Rob Lowe, Helen Hunt, Rita Wilson, Edie Falco, Rashida Jones, Jerome Bettis, Jason Sudeikis and Paula Deen.

Unfortunately, due to a technical glitch, my own questions could not be answered. However, the others asked some great questions, and Lisa responded in kind (see below).

Other geneabloggers on the call were Thomas MacEntee, Lisa Louise Cooke, Angela Walton-Raji, Kathryn Lake Hogan and Diane Haddad, along with newspaper and entertainment industry magazine writers.

Here are some questions and Lisa’s responses.

Q: What advice do you have for people who become frustrated or stuck in their research?

Lisa: There doesn’t have to ever be an end. That's what makes it such a great hobby. I think there's always research you can do on different branches, different cousins and you go back. And then it's not just names and dates. Then you start looking at where they were living, what was happening there at that time, you start looking at historical documents. And you can maybe draw some conclusions or guesses about what was motivating some of their choices in life.

Continue reading "WDYTYA: An interview with Lisa Kudrow" »

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