23    Jun 20150 comments

5 mistakes to avoid with event dates: Webinar

We recently hosted a webinar - "5 mistakes to avoid with event dates” - featuring one of our expert genealogist Laurence Harris.

Deciphering dates can be confusing in records, especially with uncommon date formats. Laurence provided tips for interpreting those difficult dates to help uncover more about your family history.

Did you miss it? Don't worry! Click on the video below to watch the full webinar.

Don’t forget to check our other webinars for many more genealogy tips to help make family history research easier.

Have ideas for other webinars? Let us know in the comments below.

18    Jun 20156 comments

Family: Planning a roots trip?

Contributing author Schelly Talalay Dardashti is the US Genealogy Advisor for MyHeritage.com

Are you planning a family roots trip in the future? If so, it's time to make plans.

Whether you stay at home or plan an international trip, the basics are the same: Decide where you are going and what information you would like to find. Contact local historic or genealogical societies in the area for more information, and see below for even more suggestions.

Make a list of your names of interest and the towns your ancestors lived in. Try to group the towns regionally, by a particular geographic area. If this is an ambitious trip, you may want to make several groupings of towns.

A good way to put everything into perspective is to get a big map of the region you are planning to explore. Go to your local office supply store and pick up a few packages of colored transparent removable adhesive dots - they come in all sizes. Using the transparent ones mean you won't cover up important information.

Color-code your map. For example, put a red dot for the town, a blue dot for the cemetery, a yellow dot for archives, courthouses or libraries, and a green dot for possible accommodations. Use other colors for restaurants or other landmarks.

And, if your family is coming with you, mark sites they would like to visit with you or on their own, while you are digging through archives and cemeteries. Pay attention to fun places like water parks, amusement parks, a beach, music festivals or childrens' museums. Remember that cemeteries are not high on other people's must-see lists. Continue reading "Family: Planning a roots trip?" »

10    Jun 20150 comments

Webinar: 5 mistakes to avoid with event dates

Have you come across any obstacles with understanding event dates? Deciphering dates can be confusing in records, especially with uncommon date formats.

Join expert genealogist Laurence Harris for a free webinar on Wednesday, June 17. He'll provide tips for interpreting difficult dates to help uncover more about your family history.

Register for free here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1831742758010374145

Continue reading "Webinar: 5 mistakes to avoid with event dates" »

7    Jun 20154 comments

Sources: Where did I find that?

Contributing author Schelly Talalay Dardashti is the US Genealogy Advisor for MyHeritage.com

How good is your memory?

Many years ago, when I was very new at the genealogy game, I really believed I could accurately remember where I had discovered every bit of family data. And - for awhile - I actually could do that.

However, as the years went by, the numbers of people in my trees increased - while my brain cells seemed to decrease - it became impossible. Sometimes, I would write the information on a scrap of paper. We all know what happens to a scrap of paper stuck in a bag or pocket.

At one point, I had to stop all new research and backtrack, almost to the beginning of my quest, to fill in all those blanks.

Fortunately, I had even saved some of those scraps of paper on which I had scribbled information while visiting archives and libraries. To preserve them, I had taped them onto regular sheets of white paper. Eventually, I transferred that data to the family tree software I used, but the scraps didn't cover all my research. Continue reading "Sources: Where did I find that?" »

26    May 201557 comments

13 ways to know you’re a genealogist

Whether you are a family historian or just someone interested in learning about their family’s heritage, there are certain things only a genealogist will understand.

You’ve been hit with the genealogy bug if…

  1. When introducing someone you say, “this is my sister’s grandmother’s father’s son.”
  2. You are more interested in what happened in 1815 than in 2015. Continue reading "13 ways to know you’re a genealogist" »
30    Apr 201518 comments

Names: What’s in the middle?

Middle names. Some people have them; others don’t. The three-name structure we use today (given, middle and last name) began in the Middle Ages when Europeans wanted to give a child a saint’s name and a traditional family name, but middle name use goes back even further.

In ancient Rome, it was an honor given to important people to have multiple names. Later - in the 1700s - aristocrats began to give their children long names to indicate his or her place in society. For example, Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge. Continue reading "Names: What’s in the middle?" »

27    Apr 20152 comments

Our Stories: Age doesn’t matter

Erik Elkan

When you think of a genealogist, what does that person look like?

An elderly person, perhaps? Someone who has lots of time on their hands and for whom family history research utilizes that time?

Think again – this is the story of young Swedish genealogist Erik Elkan, 19, who proves that genealogy is a pursuit for everyone - regardless of age.

Thousands of people in Sweden - and everywhere else around the world - have, at some point, sat down and looked at old family photos. Many have looked deep into their closets and cupboards for family belongings; some have been more successful than others.

The important thing for Erik - as one of that multitude - is the moment when something completely new about deceased relatives is discovered, he says, whether it is in a dusty photo album or a hand-drawn family tree that has lost almost all its color. Continue reading "Our Stories: Age doesn’t matter" »

13    Feb 20150 comments

RootsTech 2015: Day 1

The MyHeritage team is in Utah for RootsTech, the largest family history event in North America.

Here are some highlights from day 1.

Continue reading "RootsTech 2015: Day 1" »

8    Feb 20151 comment

RootsTech 2015: MyHeritage heads to Utah

We’re looking forward to seeing our old friends and meeting new ones at RootsTech 2015.

RootsTech, the largest family history event in North America, is a unique family history conference for both new and experienced genealogists. It is a place to learn about new technologies that bring families together and help make family history discoveries easier.

This year’s event will take place February 11-14 in Salt Lake City, Utah, and we're proud to be Platinum Sponsors.

On Thursday, February 12, MyHeritage Chief Product Officer Mike Mallin will give a keynote address in the main lecture hall. Later that day Mike will be presenting "Instant Discoveries and Family Storytelling in the Mobile World," at a MyHeritage-sponsored lunch.

The MyHeritage Team will be speaking at classes throughout the conference. Here is a list of the great talks we have lined up:

Continue reading "RootsTech 2015: MyHeritage heads to Utah" »

12    Jan 201535 comments

Understanding Dates: Five common mistakes to avoid

This post was written by Laurence Harris, Head of Genealogy UK at MyHeritage.

It is important to record key events of our ancestors, including the date when each event occurred.

Usually several sources indicate an event's date. For example, for a death: the date may be indicated on a death certificate, a headstone, a newspaper obituary and in a Grant of Probate (which authorizes distribution of a deceased person's estate). However, those dates would have been documented using the calendar and recording conventions of the geographical location and time when the event originally took place, rather than the calendar and conventions with which today's researcher would be familiar. Failure to take into account the original context of an event or document often results in mistakes in understanding when an event actually happened.

Here are five of the most common mistakes that can occur in interpreting dates, together with suggestions as to how these mistakes can be avoided or corrected. Continue reading "Understanding Dates: Five common mistakes to avoid" »

About us  |  Privacy  |  Tell a friend  |  Support  |  Site map
Copyright © 2015 MyHeritage Ltd., All rights reserved