1    Apr 20151 comment

Not an April Fools’ Joke: Guess Who’s Related? PM David Cameron and Kim Kardashian

As British Prime Minister David Cameron begins his re-election campaign, he's made an interesting revelation about his family history.

In a video interview with Heat, he's confirmed that he and Kim Kardashian, are 13th cousins!

This relationship was originally reported in two articles in the Daily Mail, following research by AJ Jacobs who's been using The World Family Tree on Geni.com (owned and operated by MyHeritage) for his Global Family Reunion project.
AJ will be hosting the world's largest family reunion in New York City on June 6th, 2015.

David Cameron and Kim Kardashian relationship path from Geni.com

David Cameron and Kim Kardashian relationship path from Geni.com (click to see full path)

Continue reading "Not an April Fools’ Joke: Guess Who’s Related? PM David Cameron and Kim Kardashian" »

5    Mar 20154 comments

Family History Journey: Visiting Ancestral Towns

My paternal great-grandmother’s line has a long history as founders of the town where she was born. Her parents were born there, my grandmother was born there, and my father grew up in the same place, before emigrating to the U.S.

My grandmother, who still lives there, lives minutes away from the house where she grew up. Each time we visit her, it’s like going back in time to see the places where she spent her childhood as we relive my ancestors’ history. Continue reading "Family History Journey: Visiting Ancestral Towns" »

19    Feb 20157 comments

Our Ancestors: Romantic meetings

The best love stories are not those from films or storybooks, but those from our own families. These stories stay with us as lasting memories and are passed down through the generations.


Before Valentine’s Day, we asked readers to share romantic stories of how their ancestors met. Here are some of them: Continue reading "Our Ancestors: Romantic meetings" »

15    Feb 20150 comments

RootsTech 2015: Day 3

And so another RootsTech conference comes to an end. But what an incredible few days it's been!

Today saw RootsTech's largest crowd ever. The exhibit hall was filled to capacity with people of all ages, interested in family history.

Today was also family day, so 2000 extra young people and families attended.

All our demos were well attended and people flooded our team with questions.

Continue reading "RootsTech 2015: Day 3" »

13    Feb 20150 comments

RootsTech 2015: Day 1

The MyHeritage team is in Utah for RootsTech, the largest family history event in North America.

Here are some highlights from day 1.

Continue reading "RootsTech 2015: Day 1" »

11    Feb 20150 comments

Time Capsules: Historical treasures

Historical treasures are  sometimes only discovered years after they have been stashed away or hidden. Once found, they may reveal a wealth of information.

This was the case when the oldest-known time capsule in the US was recently opened in Massachusetts. In 1795, Paul Revere and Samuel Adams buried it at the Massachusetts State House.

Boston Time Capsule Revealed. Image Credit: History.Com

During repairs to the building in 1855, the time capsule was removed and contents cleaned, but put back - with added objects - for almost 160 years. This time, historians went through the contents and saw history unfold. Inside, they discovered five folded newspapers, coins, a silver engraved plate, a Massachusetts Commonwealth seal and a title page from Massachusetts colony records.

Opening the time capsule provided a treasure trove of historical information and documents to learn about the past. It’s easy to create your own family time capsule, filled with memories and documents. to preserve for future generations to remember us. Continue reading "Time Capsules: Historical treasures" »

31    Jan 20151 comment

Our Stories: What’s in the box?

Duncan Barrett

London resident Duncan Barrett is a writer and editor, specializing in biography and memoir.

He grew up in London and studied English at Jesus College, Cambridge. He is the author or co-author of several Sunday Times top-10 bestsellers, such as “The Sugar Girls,” and “GI Brides.” His most recent book (August 2014) is “Men of Letters: The Post Office Heroes Who Fought the Great War.”

After his grandmother, Helen Hudson, died in 2006, Duncan’s mother Michèle received a box containing documents and artifacts relating to his family history.

I had been familiar with the box all my life, but it was only then that I began exploring its contents. As well as objects – and associated stories – that related to ancestors I had never known, there was all the research work that my grandmother and my aunt had done into the family history, putting together family trees and organizing the material in the box. Looking through it made me feel closer to the grandmother I had lost.

A lock of Gerald’s hair is preserved in a black brooch in the box

Growing up, Duncan never felt that interested in the lives of his ancestors who lived before he was born – they seemed very remote, anonymous faces in photo albums. But he was able to get to know them quite intimately as he read through the materials in box, particularly through the letters exchanged among the relatives. Continue reading "Our Stories: What’s in the box?" »

19    Jan 20154 comments

Our Stories: Searching for 60 years

Ann's mother and father at their wedding

After 60 years of searching, MyHeritage found the connection – in just two months - between Australia’s Ann Clare Meagher’s mother Hilda Welchman Moss, and Ann’s previously unknown maternal uncle, John Welchman, in the UK.

Ann’s mother, Hilda, died at 32, leaving six children, when Ann was nine. Her father, Fred Moss, was a British Army major posted to India, and Ann was born in Lahore (now Pakistan) in 1945. Her mother Hilda Welchman had travelled to India from England and she married in 1941.

As a teen, I often wondered about my grandparents, as I had no knowledge or contact with them. We moved to Melbourne, Australia in 1962. I became a nurse, and have been happily married for 43 years, with a wonderful husband and three sons.

Ann had spent years looking for any relative of her mother without success until she became a member of MyHeritage and found her previously unknown uncle. She discovered a story he had written about his life and was dumb-founded that he had been looking for his sister’s family for 60 years. He lives in Dorset, England. Continue reading "Our Stories: Searching for 60 years" »

12    Jan 201535 comments

Understanding Dates: Five common mistakes to avoid

This post was written by Laurence Harris, Head of Genealogy UK at MyHeritage.

It is important to record key events of our ancestors, including the date when each event occurred.

Usually several sources indicate an event's date. For example, for a death: the date may be indicated on a death certificate, a headstone, a newspaper obituary and in a Grant of Probate (which authorizes distribution of a deceased person's estate). However, those dates would have been documented using the calendar and recording conventions of the geographical location and time when the event originally took place, rather than the calendar and conventions with which today's researcher would be familiar. Failure to take into account the original context of an event or document often results in mistakes in understanding when an event actually happened.

Here are five of the most common mistakes that can occur in interpreting dates, together with suggestions as to how these mistakes can be avoided or corrected. Continue reading "Understanding Dates: Five common mistakes to avoid" »

3    Jan 20154 comments

5 tips to start your family history research

2015 is here! Have you thought about what you'd like to accomplish this year in your family history research?

Here are some tips for a successful year in your genealogy journey: Continue reading "5 tips to start your family history research" »

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