28    Mar 20135 comments

Competition: Win ‘Labyrinth’ on DVD!

Do you have any secrets passed down through your family's generations?

Labyrinth is the story of two intelligent headstrong heroines, 17-year-old Alaïs Pelletier (Jessica Brown Findlay) from 13th century Carcassonne and modern-day PhD graduate Dr. Alice Tanner (Vanessa Kirby), who experience an adventure that intertwines their lives.

After inheriting a house in the South of France from an aunt she has never met, Alice stumbles upon an 800-year-old archaeological find.

Separated by time, but united in a common destiny, Alice is driven to find out about Alaïs and the past, which leads her through a journey into discovering the stories behind secrets passed down through the generations.

Continue reading "Competition: Win ‘Labyrinth’ on DVD!" »

19    Mar 20133 comments

Poll: Where are your ancestors from?

Genealogical research today is very different from that of a few years ago.

Sites like MyHeritage enable us to communicate with more people, faster and more easily, while reaching out to others worldwide.

Tools - such as Smart Matcheshelp you discover new ancestors and possible relatives with similarities in their family trees and who may have a direct relationship with you.

Today we'd like to know what you discovered when researching your family heritage. Where do your ancestors come from?

Tell us your stories in the comments below, or via Facebook , Twitter or Google+


26    Feb 20130 comments

Family History: Our children, their ancestors

When the genealogy “bug” hits us, we just can't help ourselves. We want to search deeper into our heritage.

It's disappointing when some family members don't share our ancestor interest. We want them to ask questions and learn about our shared family history.

A great way to start is with our children and grandchildren.

Children are curious about black-and-white photos, strange names, and seeing a family tree filled with images of people they may or may not know. Most importantly, they ask questions - lots of questions!

Children love listening to stories, so reading to them about the family is a great way to grab their interest and demonstrate that they are part of a grander history. Sharing family moments creates a stronger family bond, as well as a chance to share ancestral information.

Do you share family stories with your children and grandchildren? How do you pass on your unique heritage to the younger generations? Let us know in the comments below.

23    Jan 20135 comments

Weddings: Celebrating the present, remembering the past

At family celebrations, and especially at weddings, we tend to think about those relatives who are no longer with us.

My colleague Javier showed me an article in the Spanish magazine Zankyou, which discusses marriage as the merging of two family trees, and therefore the perfect occasion to honor our ancestors.

The article suggests some very original ways to not only think about those relatives who have passed on, but actually incorporate genealogy in our wedding celebrations.

One way is with jewelry. Some people choose to wear a special family heirloom, like a brooch, others use their ancestors' rings as their own wedding bands.

Artist Ashley Gilreath takes it one step further. Ashley specializes in creating pieces that fuse heirlooms with their story, and like the necklace below, with genealogy. Continue reading "Weddings: Celebrating the present, remembering the past" »

16    Jan 20134 comments

Family History: Our place in space

How do our surroundings, our homes, impact our families, our thoughts, our history?

Isn't this what our pursuit of genealogy helps to reconstruct? To make sure that our family history remains alive and known and preserved?

In a poem by Leib Borisovich Talalai, a young poet whose family was from our ancestral village of Vorotinschtina, Belarus, and who was murdered in Minsk (1941), he writes about his family home in the village, "If the walls of this house could talk. ..." When I found two of his slim books of poetry at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC, it was fascinating to read his words.

What an image he presented of a home’s talking walls! What if we could access those memories? What do you know about the spaces in which your ancestors lived? Continue reading "Family History: Our place in space" »

14    Nov 20123 comments

Poll: How old is your oldest living relative?

We've written about Besse Cooper, the oldest person alive in the US at 116, and tweeted about the worlds longest married couple (87 years) and shared their longevity secrets.

Now, we'd like to ask who is the oldest living relative in your tree?


Who's the oldest ancestor you've discovered? What were their longevity secrets? Let us know in the comments section below.

3    Oct 20120 comments

Genea-journey: Using Google’s Street View

As I grew up, I often heard about the places my family came from, the countries, cities, streets and houses in which they lived.

We recently wrote about Genea-journeys, which we described as "a journey to research your family history and discover new relatives and information about them, or it could be an actual physical trip to the places your ancestors lived."

Without the chance to personally visit my ancestors' homes, I wondered what they looked like. I wanted to get a sense of the physical surroundings in which they lived.

After reading an interesting article about how to use Google Images for family history research, I decided to take my own virtual genea-journey using Google's Street View. This tool lets you tour - virtually - almost any road in the world.

Continue reading "Genea-journey: Using Google’s Street View" »

1    Oct 20126 comments

Poll: Larger families in days gone by?

In times gone by, were families so much bigger than today?

My grandmother was one of eight and my grandfather one of seven. Many of my ancestors also came from large families. I used to wonder whether people tended to have bigger families.

According to UK statistics, the 1900 birth rate was 3.5 children per family;  by the end of the century (1997), the rate fell to 1.7 children.

Why do you think people had larger families back then?

What about your family? How many siblings did your grandparents have?

Let us know in the poll below.


24    Sep 20121 comment

Family: Genetic memories?

Do you feel a connection to your ancestors in a fundamental way?

Genetic memory is what we call that “feeling” that some individuals have, where they connect with their ancestors in some strange or unusual way.

Today, such people may be of different religions and nationalities than their ancestors, but still feel an unusual connection – often since childhood – to those ancestors who lived very different lives.

Biologically, we are all links in a chain to our past generations. Can these biological links connect us to our ancestors in different ways?

Writes journalist and author Doreen Carvajal:

I'm intrigued by the notion that generations pass on particular survival skills and, perhaps, an unconscious sense of identity that stands the test of centuries. In the case of my own Catholic Carvajal family, I wonder what prompted them to guard the secret of their Sephardic Jewish identity for generations long after the Spanish Inquisition that prompted them to flee to Costa Rica in Central America.

Continue reading "Family: Genetic memories?" »

21    Sep 20123 comments

Poll: Do you have family heirlooms?

Many families treasure one or more family heirlooms passed down through the generations from their ancestors.

Whether these cherished items are personal objects, letters or photos,  they hold great sentimental value and help preserve memories of previous generations.

In my family, we're fortunate to have artifacts and original documents from the older generations. We also love looking through the old family photo albums; it's interesting seeing the relatives, how they dressed and where they lived.

What about your family? Do you have family heirlooms?

Let us know in the poll below.


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