5    Sep 20142 comments

Daddy’s Girl: 50 rules for dads of daughters

Michael Mitchell took “Daddy’s girl” to a new level with 50 rules for dads of daughters.

The 30-year-old dad writes daily tips and life lessons at Life to Her Years including many things to enhance the father-daughter relationship.

Image credit: vintageantiqueclassics.com

We loved the list, and wanted to highlight some of his great “rules” for dads with daughters. See the full list here. Continue reading "Daddy’s Girl: 50 rules for dads of daughters" »

3    Sep 20142 comments

MyHeritage and BillionGraves honored for global crowdsourcing project

We work hard to provide greater access to family history information and so were thrilled to be awarded the Presidential Citation at the FGS (Federation of Genealogical Societies) conference this past weekend, along with BillionGraves, for our partnership in promoting the preservation of international burial locations.

The Federation of Genealogical Societies was established in 1976 and represents more than 500 member genealogy and history societies, including over a half-million individual members. You can learn more about FGS in our genealogy society spotlight blog post.

Gravestones are a great resource for family history investigation and a useful tool to learn more about your ancestors. They provide detailed information such as names, dates of birth and death and often describe personality. However, natural wear and tear means that these important family history sources need to be preserved before it’s too late. Together, MyHeritage and BillionGraves launched a global initiative to digitize cemeteries and gravestones to preserve these gravestones by making them accessible for free online to millions to aid in their family history research.

Watch the video below to hear MyHeritage Founder and CEO Gilad Japhet explain the tremendous importance of this project and the value of gravestones for genealogy.

Continue reading "MyHeritage and BillionGraves honored for global crowdsourcing project" »

1    Sep 2014278 comments

Labor Day: 10 jobs that are obsolete

Did your great-grandfather cut ice for a living? Perhaps your grandmother was a switchboard operator and connected calls from house to house?

There are so many professions that our ancestors once followed that are now extinct today.

Here are 10 examples of professions that no longer exist:

1) A scissors-grinder was a street merchant that sharpened the blades of knives and scissors. He would call out in the streets or knock at the doors to try and get business. He worked the stone grinding wheel with his foot using a treadle.

A scissors-grinder in 1909. Credit: Maryland Historical Society Library.

Continue reading "Labor Day: 10 jobs that are obsolete" »

30    Aug 201418 comments

Our Stories: Genetics leads to genealogy

Some people begin with traditional family history and turn to genetics to find more connections, but MyHeritage member Peggy Shackelford, 64, of Southern California began her geneajourney to understand the genetics in her family.

She has two grown daughters and three dogs. She holds a BS in computer and management sciences and works as a business intelligence developer. Although born just outside Chicago (in Hammond, Indiana), Peggy grew up in northern California. Her work involves analytical research and developing business intelligence software.

Peggy and her family at a recent family gathering. Peggy is center back in the peach color.

About 30 years ago she started the journey to discover her family roots. Armed only with some family stories she began her research. It was very hard going back then, she says. There was very little available online and most of her research involved sifting through microfilms of census records to find people and clues. Continue reading "Our Stories: Genetics leads to genealogy" »

28    Aug 20141 comment

WWI: Unknown animal heroes

When we speak of war heroes, we generally refer to the brave men and women who fought and died for their country. Yet, many animals were on the frontlines with the soldiers. These heroic animals transported equipment, sent secret notes and informed of enemy movements.

Horses carrying ammunition at the Battle of Vimy Ridge

Horses:
Horses were used for transporting food, artillery, equipment and to carry wounded soldiers. Eight million horses from all sides of the war died during WWI. Continue reading "WWI: Unknown animal heroes" »

26    Aug 20143 comments

An Unusual Family Reunion: Opening the family crypt

It was a family reunion unlike any other. When members of the Douse family met in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island (Canada) last month, one of the central events of the week-long event was excavating their ancestor's crypt. They gathered from all over the world, coming from Ohio, Michigan, and as far as Zimbabwe.

Their story was featured in the Toronto Star last week.

Their ancestor, William Douse, arrived at Prince Edward Island, from Wiltshire, England, in 1822. He was known for his strong wit and tenacity. He was a character, and became well-known on the island. He contributed to the early evolution of P.E.I., serving nearly three decades in the island Assembly, longer than any politician in history.

An oil portrait of William Douse (1800-1864). Image credit: Douse family.

Continue reading "An Unusual Family Reunion: Opening the family crypt" »

23    Aug 20141 comment

WWI Heroes: British women of the war

While many men went out to fight, it’s important to also remember the little known heroes who fought for their countries during the war.

Many brave women - doctors, nurses and soldiers - served on the battlefront, risking their lives to save others.

In honor of the WWI centenary, we highlight just a few of those heroic women: Continue reading "WWI Heroes: British women of the war" »

21    Aug 20141 comment

Golden Genealogy Rules: Webinar

What’s the best way to begin your family tree?  What should you look out for in historical records to learn more about your ancestors? These are just some of the questions Australian Geneablogger Shauna Hicks spoke about in last week’s webinar on the Golden Rules of Genealogy.

Shauna gave great tips and tricks to jumpstart your family history research and help discover more about your ancestors, build a family tree and how to uncover information from historical records.

Don’t worry if you happened to miss out!  Click on the video below for the whole webinar.

Want more genealogy tips? Check our other webinars for more ways to help make your family history research easier.

Start your journey of discovery today, build a free family tree, and let us know what you find out!

19    Aug 20144 comments

Childhood Homes: Fond memories

I remember the home that I grew up in with many fond memories. We moved into our suburban home, in Canada, when I was only 4 years old. We lived in the same house until after I left home for university.

I didn't realize that I still had an emotional attachment to that home, until I went back for a visit recently, with my own family.

On a recent visit, I took my family back to my old house. Some things had changed on the outside -- the garden wasn't as beautiful, the shutters were painted a different color, but above all, the house still looked the same.

My childhood home.

Continue reading "Childhood Homes: Fond memories" »

16    Aug 20149 comments

Secrets to Longevity: 111 years young

On June 8,  the world’s oldest man, Alexander Imich, died at the age of 111 years and 124 days, in Manhattan. He had held the honor of oldest man since April 24, 2014 when his predecessor died.

Imich was a Polish-born American chemist and parapsychologist who emigrated to the United States in 1951. Throughout his life he had always enjoyed good health, which he believed was the reason he had lived so long.

Some of his tips to leading a long life include a healthy diet, regular exercise or sport, not smoking or drinking alcohol and his genes. Imich came from a family with ancestors who all lived to an old age.

The current oldest man is Japanese-born Sakari Momoi, born one day after Imich on February 5, 1903.

What is the current oldest living member of your family? What’s the longest your ancestors lived?

Let us know in the comments below.

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