15    Aug 20130 comments

Competition: The largest family photo

Last week we asked you to send in your oldest family photos as part of a weekly competition to win a free photo consultation with Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective. This week, we would like to see your photos with the largest number of family members.

We also want to thank everyone who submitted beautiful images showcasing their family history. We received hundreds of photos from around the world, dating back to the 1850s!

Eunice Baldwin Whedon (b. 1778, d. 1854)

Congratulations to Janice Moerschel who sent in this photo of  her relative Eunice Baldwin Whedon from Branford, New Haven, Connecticut. You can see her photo consultation with Maureen Taylor here.

It was difficult to choose a winner from the photos submitted. View all the entries on our Pinterest board here.

However, the competition isn't over. This week, we're giving one lucky winner a chance to win another free photo consultation with Maureen. Continue reading "Competition: The largest family photo" »

14    Aug 20133 comments

Uncovering stories: Free webinar with the Photo Detective

Photos hold the key to your family story. They allow us a glimpse into the lives and personalities of our ancestors.

Join Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective, who will show you how you can learn more about your family history from old photos in our free online webinar.

As a photo curator, genealogist, writer and photo analysis expert, Maureen focuses on family photos, history and genealogy.

She is an internationally recognized expert who helps solve photo-related family mysteries and discovers stories behind family photos.

Continue reading "Uncovering stories: Free webinar with the Photo Detective" »

12    Aug 20131 comment

Treasure Family Photos: Tips for taking great pictures

Viewing old family photos brings up nostalgic memories.  Whether it’s a wedding, a picnic in the park or goofing around at home, it’s important to preserve those family moments.

We have wonderful old photos from our ancestors, yet it’s also important to document our lives and cherish today's family gatherings and events.

However, it can be difficult encouraging the kids and and the entire family together to sit for a portrait. That’s why - as part of our “Treasure Family Photos” global initiative - we are offering tips to save and share your family story.

Here are some tips for taking a great family photo: Continue reading "Treasure Family Photos: Tips for taking great pictures" »

8    Aug 20130 comments

Competition: Free Photo Consultation with The Photo Detective

Want to know more about that old family photograph? Unsure who those people are next to your grandparents?

In honor of our global “Treasure Family Photos” initiative, we're excited to offer weekly competitions to help discover the history behind your old photos.

Each week, one lucky winner will have the chance to join Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective and world-class expert in photo analysis, for a free photo consultation session.

The winner will be able to show Maureen their photos and learn more about them. A photo curator, genealogist and preservation expert, she’ll help you uncover the history behind your pictures and discover more about your ancestors.

Continue reading "Competition: Free Photo Consultation with The Photo Detective" »

6    Aug 20135 comments

MyHeritage launches global initiative: “Treasure Family Photos”

We’re delighted to announce the launch of our global “Treasure Family Photos” initiative to help you uncover new information about your family history through photos and preserve them online.

August marks the start of our ongoing campaign, which will offer exciting activities and competitions. Read on for details.

Continue reading "MyHeritage launches global initiative: “Treasure Family Photos”" »

5    Aug 20131 comment

Your Stories: A trip to Mali with Mahamadou Gary

Today we're on a journey to Mali, with a family adventure first shared on our MyHeritage French blog.

MyHeritage user Mahmadou Gary was born in Fatao (Cercle of Diéma in the Kayes Region of western Mali) in 1956.

Mahamadou Gary

His studies led him all the way to Kishinev, Moldova, where he obtained a Master's Degree in Biology and became a biology professor at Lycée Sankoré of Bamako. After leaving Kishinev, he earned a doctorate in biology at the University of Bamako, where he continued his career.

He was also the mayor of the municipality of Fatao from 1999 to 2004.

Mahmadou first became interested in family history when he attended his mother's funeral in the local village.

Continue reading "Your Stories: A trip to Mali with Mahamadou Gary" »

3    Aug 20131 comment

What’s in a name?: Strangers pick a baby’s name

For many expecting parents, it can be difficult to think of the perfect name for an unborn baby.

Many people turn to baby name books or choose an ancestor's name, but one US couple decided to take their name search to a vote, at their local Starbucks.

The New Haven, Connecticut couple asked customers to vote for two names: Logan and Jackson. With over 1,800 votes and many other name suggestions, they decided to combine the two names and will call their son, due in September, Logan Jackson.

Some might say the controversial idea of  asking strangers to name a  baby lacks that personal element of naming a child after a relative. Others may find this a relief and a unique way to choose a name.

We recently wrote about names banned in New Zealand and have asked about rare names in your family tree.

What do you think of crowd sourcing for baby names? Do you have a similar story in your family where relatives were named by strangers? Would you ask others to choose your child's name?

Let us know your stories and thoughts in the comments below, on Facebook, Twitter, and Google +.

1    Aug 20132 comments

1790: First US Census Day

The US Census is the nation’s largest and most important set of records. They are invaluable to everyone interested in discovering their family history.

This week marks the original Census Day, which took place on the first Monday in August in 1790.

The 1790 Census was the first census conducted, numbering the then-population at  3,929,214.

Thomas Jefferson in the 1790 U.S. Census. Note occupation listed as 'Sec of State to the US' (click to zoom)

Census records provide a snapshot into the lives of our ancestors by documenting names, addresses, birthplace, members of household and more. Continue reading "1790: First US Census Day" »

29    Jul 20134 comments

MyHeritage discovers heirs for unclaimed assets confiscated during WWII

We have often discussed the importance of building family trees and how genealogy can be used to make exciting family discoveries.

Gilad Japhet, MyHeritage's Founder & CEO, read an article a few months ago concerning the compensation for Jewish-owned German property that had been confiscated by the Nazis during World War II.

The article linked to a list compiled by the Claims Conference of around 40,000 properties (homes, buildings, stores and factories) located in former East Germany. The descendants of these property owners are entitled to compensation.

MyHeritage notified Cati Holland that she was eligible for compensation (Credit: Oded Balilty/AP)

Gilad initiated a project to use MyHeritage resources to try and match the people on this list, the original property owners, with their living descendants. Continue reading "MyHeritage discovers heirs for unclaimed assets confiscated during WWII" »

27    Jul 20133 comments

Ty’s Journey: Part 2

When you travel abroad, you have an opportunity to visit your ancestral home, as well as the important buildings and locations that might have been relevant to your ancestor’s life. These include houses of worship, schools, businesses, beaches, parks and other locations your ancestors may have frequented.

Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury England (near Stonehenge)

In addition, you may be able to visit repositories holding documents for your family, including libraries, archives and record offices. However, just showing up at a location won’t always do much good. It’s important to pre-plan and do prep work before you visit, or you may just be frustrated and come away with little of real value.

Here are some tips to help you make the most of your visit. Continue reading "Ty’s Journey: Part 2" »

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