23    Apr 20140 comments

Shakespeare: His life and legacy

Today marks 450 years since the birthday of English poet, playwright and actor, William Shakespeare.
Possibly born April 23 1564, Shakespeare is widely regarded as one of the greatest writers in English literature and someone who revolutionized theater. The third of eight children, his father, John Shakespeare, was a glover, trader and local politician, and his mother was Mary Arden. His parents were first cousins, not uncommon in those times.

Although William's exact date of birth is unknown, we do know that he was baptized on April 26. In those times, baptism took place no more than a few days after birth, and therefore April 23, 1564 is widely recognized as his date of birth. Continue reading "Shakespeare: His life and legacy" »

24    Mar 201412 comments

Ten Inventions: What were they thinking?

Not all inventions have been successful. Here are some bizarre inventions that will make you wonder what their inventors were thinking!

1. A fold-up piano, designed for bedridden patients, Britain, 1935:

Image credit: imgur.com

Continue reading "Ten Inventions: What were they thinking?" »

13    Dec 201322 comments

Surnames: Different countries, different traditions

Surnames or family names are the part of a person’s name that is passed down through families, or given according to law or custom. Many cultures have different customs for how names are passed from generation to generation.

Surnames originate from the relatively "recent" medieval custom of bynames, or names given to differentiate people.

Continue reading "Surnames: Different countries, different traditions" »

8    Dec 20138 comments

Dear Santa: Then and now

"Dear Santa..."

As Christmas nears, millions of children around the world are using these two words to begin their letters to Santa , with the hope he will bring what they want.

These letters are often sent by obliging parents to Santa's home at the North Pole. However, back in time, it was popular to send "Dear Santa" letters to a local newspaper, which published them.

Our newspaper collection includes over 120 million pages dating back to 1609, and a quick search using the keywords "Dear Santa" brings really interesting results... Continue reading "Dear Santa: Then and now" »

2    Dec 201327 comments

Five skills: Our grandparents had them – we don’t

Have you thought about the skills your grandparents had, but that are no longer common today? Here are the top five skills:

1. The ability to write long, handwritten letters:

Do you still write letters by hand and send them by mail? Nowadays, most of us write emails and text messages, but not long, handwritten letters.


Old letters sent to family and friends

Continue reading "Five skills: Our grandparents had them – we don’t" »

22    Nov 20131 comment

John F. Kennedy: His life and his legacy

Where were you when you heard about John F. Kennedy’s assassination?

It shocked the world and shook the very foundations of our liberty and freedom. Today marks 50 years since that devastating day, November 22, 1963, when President Kennedy was assassinated.

John F. Kennedy was the 35th President of the United States, the youngest president elected. He was a man that the country identified with. He sent the first man to the moon.

On this 50th anniversary of his death, we celebrate his life and his legacy. Continue reading "John F. Kennedy: His life and his legacy" »

19    Oct 20133 comments

Our Stories: Papa’s Diary

Wouldn't it be exciting to read the diary of an ancestor who recorded his or her daily activities?

Matt Unger, a 40-ish software executive in New York, was handed his grandfather Harry Scheurman’s 1924 diary, written when he was 29 and had been in the US for 11 years. Matt has transcribed each journal entry at his website http://papasdiary.blogspot.com. Scheurman had immigrated from Sniatyn, then in Austro-Hungary.

Matt’s project received coverage in The New York Times.

As we hear more frequently these days, family history researchers are getting bitten by the genealogy bug at ever younger ages. Although Matt was given the pocket-sized diary for a fifth-grade family history project, it wasn't until Thanksgiving 2007 that he examined it closely and decided to transcribe it.

MyHeritage interviewed Matt via email and is happy to offer his comments on this wonderful and very personal project. Continue reading "Our Stories: Papa’s Diary" »

1    Oct 2013313 comments

Family History Month: Competitions, Tips and More

October marks Family History Month - an excellent time for you and your family to learn about your family heritage. We’ll be celebrating throughout this month with exciting competitions, webinars and tips to enhance your family history research.

See this week's contest and read about our other activities.

From historical records, to building family trees, we're here to help you learn, collect and share your family history.

Continue reading "Family History Month: Competitions, Tips and More" »

2    Sep 20130 comments

Ty’s Journey: Part Three

This week, Ty travels from Dublin, Ireland to Paris, France and recounts his continuing adventures and travel tips.

In this edition of my post for MyHeritage on my travels, I went from Dublin, Ireland to Paris, France for a few nights, and then moved on to Villedieu Poeles, about 2 hours west of Paris.  The area is known for copper mining and craftsmanship, with roots to King Henry I (son of William the Conqueror), the Knights Hospitaller, Knights Templar and Knights of Malta.

On my first full day in Paris, I visited the Eiffel Tower twice, once in the early afternoon and again after sunset.  Another travel writer had asked me for some photos of the Tower at night, so I decided to give it a shot (pardon the pun).

Eiffel Tower at night during light show

When traveling for ancestral reasons, remember that almost every location – particularly in large, historic cities like Paris – offers two sides for your interests.  That which your ancestors knew: Their churches, houses or neighborhoods, places of work, and the culture of the city in general.

I've heard rumors that I might have some French ancestry, but have not yet been able to discover it. If I do, it would have been before the Eiffel Tower was built (1887-89). Yet, because my ancestors would never have seen the tower, I visited it because it's part of the city’s culture and history. Continue reading "Ty’s Journey: Part Three" »

29    Aug 201311 comments

Labor Day: Free access to all US census records

Labor Day weekend is here - a time to celebrate the contributions made by workers from the labor movement. It's also time for families to get together and enjoy the last bit of summer with barbecues, parades and reunions.

In honor of the holiday, we’re providing free access – from August 31 through September 2 – to all US Census records.

Search Now

Continue reading "Labor Day: Free access to all US census records" »

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