27    Aug 20139 comments

Tip of the month: Tree Consistency Checker

Having a large, family tree can sometimes lead to small oversights that may be difficult to identify. Some common mistakes are misspelled names, mixed-up dates or incorrect ages, while others are more difficult to detect such as a person tagged in a photo dated before they were born.

That’s where MyHeritage’s Tree Consistency Checker comes in to help fix these mistakes and improve the quality of data in your family tree.

Tree Consistency Checker is a unique, free tool that helps locate mistakes in family tree data. It automatically identifies any errors and inconsistencies in 40 categories - and shows you how to fix each of them.

Inconsistencies such as “child older than parent,” or “fact occurring after death” and “inconsistent last name spelling” will alert and enable you to make the necessary changes in your family tree.

The tool is available on our latest version of Family Tree Builder 7.0 and takes advantage of the new sync features so users with online trees can now utilize this tool as well. Users can sync their online tree to the Family Tree Builder software, and use the Tree Consistency Checker to identify any mistakes. Once you re-sync the tree back to the web, the online family tree will show all the updated information.

Don't have Family Tree Builder 7.0? Download it free here, and learn more about its new features.

We hope this tool will help you make your family tree as accurate as possible!

24    Aug 20131 comment

Boston: A visit to the New England Historic Genealogical Society

Our chief genealogist Daniel Horowitz was recently in Boston, Massachusetts for the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ 33rd conference. While there, he visited the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS), at 101 Newbury St.

Daniel met with NEHGS chief genealogist David Allen Lambert, who provided a wonderful and complete tour of the building, including some backstage areas. Here's Daniel's report of his visit.

Two Chief Genealogists together: David Allen Lambert, NEHGS (left) and Daniel Horowitz, MyHeritage (right)

It was great to meet with another Chief Genealogist!

As visitors enter the building, its wonderful architecture is apparent. David explained that the original three-floor building (now eight floors) was a bank and that they kept the original design, including the vault, where some NEHGS records are stored.

This is the second genealogical society that I've seen housed in a bank facility. Two years ago, I visited the Genealogical Society of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, where their facility is also a former bank.

The NEHGS, as a historical society, has a good collection of portraits and historical artifacts from Boston,  the New England region and other US locations, including such objects as John Hancock’s chair. Continue reading "Boston: A visit to the New England Historic Genealogical Society" »

21    Aug 20138 comments

Nostalgia: Old family photographs

A few years ago, my grandmother gave me a shoebox filled with some of her mother’s heirlooms and photos. I looked through it briefly, but had then forgotten about it until last month.

My grandmother had told me stories about her childhood, but these photo discoveries really brought my family history to life. I finally got to put faces to those stories I had heard over the past few years, and to see my family heritage displayed in front of me.

I moved last month. Although moving can be stressful, I was in for a surprise when I discovered a box filled with family treasures at the back of a closet.

Last week I sat with my grandmother and together we looked through these family memories. As we viewed each photo and heirloom, she began to tell stories she hadn't mentioned before about the people and events in each picture. Continue reading "Nostalgia: Old family photographs" »

14    Aug 20133 comments

Uncovering stories: Free webinar with the Photo Detective

Photos hold the key to your family story. They allow us a glimpse into the lives and personalities of our ancestors.

Join Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective, who will show you how you can learn more about your family history from old photos in our free online webinar.

As a photo curator, genealogist, writer and photo analysis expert, Maureen focuses on family photos, history and genealogy.

She is an internationally recognized expert who helps solve photo-related family mysteries and discovers stories behind family photos.

Continue reading "Uncovering stories: Free webinar with the Photo Detective" »

6    Aug 20135 comments

MyHeritage launches global initiative: “Treasure Family Photos”

We’re delighted to announce the launch of our global “Treasure Family Photos” initiative to help you uncover new information about your family history through photos and preserve them online.

August marks the start of our ongoing campaign, which will offer exciting activities and competitions. Read on for details.

Continue reading "MyHeritage launches global initiative: “Treasure Family Photos”" »

5    Aug 20131 comment

Your Stories: A trip to Mali with Mahamadou Gary

Today we're on a journey to Mali, with a family adventure first shared on our MyHeritage French blog.

MyHeritage user Mahmadou Gary was born in Fatao (Cercle of Diéma in the Kayes Region of western Mali) in 1956.

Mahamadou Gary

His studies led him all the way to Kishinev, Moldova, where he obtained a Master's Degree in Biology and became a biology professor at Lycée Sankoré of Bamako. After leaving Kishinev, he earned a doctorate in biology at the University of Bamako, where he continued his career.

He was also the mayor of the municipality of Fatao from 1999 to 2004.

Mahmadou first became interested in family history when he attended his mother's funeral in the local village.

Continue reading "Your Stories: A trip to Mali with Mahamadou Gary" »

1    Aug 20132 comments

1790: First US Census Day

The US Census is the nation’s largest and most important set of records. They are invaluable to everyone interested in discovering their family history.

This week marks the original Census Day, which took place on the first Monday in August in 1790.

The 1790 Census was the first census conducted, numbering the then-population at  3,929,214.

Thomas Jefferson in the 1790 U.S. Census. Note occupation listed as 'Sec of State to the US' (click to zoom)

Census records provide a snapshot into the lives of our ancestors by documenting names, addresses, birthplace, members of household and more. Continue reading "1790: First US Census Day" »

27    Jul 20133 comments

Ty’s Journey: Part 2

When you travel abroad, you have an opportunity to visit your ancestral home, as well as the important buildings and locations that might have been relevant to your ancestor’s life. These include houses of worship, schools, businesses, beaches, parks and other locations your ancestors may have frequented.

Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury England (near Stonehenge)

In addition, you may be able to visit repositories holding documents for your family, including libraries, archives and record offices. However, just showing up at a location won’t always do much good. It’s important to pre-plan and do prep work before you visit, or you may just be frustrated and come away with little of real value.

Here are some tips to help you make the most of your visit. Continue reading "Ty’s Journey: Part 2" »

21    Jul 20133 comments

Old postcards: A family history resource

Cards with messages have been mailed since the creation of the postal service. Many of us have sent postcards to our loved ones from vacations or just a quick note to say hello.

A postcard is traditionally a rectangular piece of thick paper or cardboard intended for mailing without an envelope.

The earliest known picture postcard comes from the 19th century, hand-painted by writer Theodore Hook in 1840. In the US, John P. Carlton patented the postal card and produced the first commercial cards in 1861.

The earliest known picture postcard, posted in London to writer Theodore Hook in 1840

Over the course of the 19th century, postcards gained additional popularity among all social classes. They were a convenient, inexpensive and attractive means of correspondence.

Continue reading "Old postcards: A family history resource" »

16    Jul 20130 comments

Society Spotlight: Federation of Genealogical Societies

Genealogical societies are essential to family history researchers. They provide resources, programs, conferences, and other important assistance.

MyHeritage is  spotlighting these societies in a new series over the year.

Today, we look at the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), based in Austin, Texas, and established in 1976.Headed by D. Joshua Taylor, FGS represents other genealogical and historical societies. More than 500 member societies represent over a half-million individual members in those societies.

Continue reading "Society Spotlight: Federation of Genealogical Societies" »

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